Skip to main content

Review Policy

The aim of Crowvus is to bring good quality literature to the public's attention. This blog will concentrate mainly on self published works, or books from Indie publishers.


I'm very open about what I like to read, but I generally prefer YA, historical fiction, or something with a Scottish theme.

That being said, I will read all genres if the book sounds like something I could get my teeth into.

I don't mind a bit of swearing, but if there's a swear word on every page, I probably won't gel with it!

How to Request a Review

Firstly, I'm very sorry if we don't get back to you quickly. We all have other jobs and cannot always spend as much time as we'd like on Crowvus.

If you would like to request a review, send an email to and write "Book Review - [book title]" in the subject.

In the email, please send:

Book title
Author's name
When it will be/was published
Links to where the book is for sale
Book format (is it an e-book, or hardcopy?)

If I can review your book, I will then get in touch with you and ask for a copy, and a picture of the front cover (for the blog post).


I will accept paperbacks and e-books (I do have a kindle).

Where will it be Posted?

I will post the review on this blog, on Amazon, and on Goodreads. If you'd like me to post it anywhere else, let me know!

Happy Writing!


Popular posts from this blog

Teaching Tips from 'Harry Potter'

When I was at primary school, I liked Harry Potter. I wasn't really crazy about it like some of my classmates were, but I liked it. My sister and I used to act out what we thought should happen (not all the books had been released at this point) and we got parts of it startlingly correct. I've got lots of happy memories of playing in the bedroom or in the garden.

Now I'm a teacher, I am beginning to appreciate the series more and more as I see my pupils encouraged to read the books having enjoyed the films so much. We recently dressed up for World Book Day and (aside from myself - a proud Hufflepuff) there were plenty of Harrys and Hermiones.

But aside from being a great story for adults and children, the series can also give teachers some great tips. I recently sent a Harry Potter clip to a teacher friend to cheer her up, declaring that it was classic active learning!

(Active learning is one of those buzzwords that educationalists love. And it's a great teaching meth…

"Day's Dying Glory" Book Launch

11th April 2017 The Ropewalk Barton upon Humber North Lincolnshire

The first of anything is always a daunting experience. The first book launch for a story that has been years in the making, and embodying a little segment of our souls into each page, is a terrifying experience.
We’ve been planning the launch of Day’s Dying Glory by Virginia Crow for several months now so, when the time came to make it over to The Ropewalk in Barton-on-Humber on the 11th April, we weren’t really sure what to say.
The tension disappeared, however, when we arrived at The Ropery Hall and people started arriving. My sister, Judith, had surprised us by travelling down that day – all the way from the north of Scotland – to be with us on this momentous occasion. As more and more people arrived, some of whom I knew from when we lived in Lincolnshire, the atmosphere grew more and more enjoyable.
After I introduced the author, Virginia Crow read us some sections from her book. The readings were centred around the t…

The Greatest Lesson the Bronte Sisters Gave Us

On this day in 1816, Charlotte Bronte was born – author of Jane Eyre and older sister of Emily and Anne Bronte who were also writers. It’s quite poignant to stop and think of these events that happened so long ago, but in a family of strong-willed individuals, it isn’t long before there is a debate opportunity:

Which has the better ending?

Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte has an almost fairytale like ending. Everything is resolved for the better – there is love and a convenient change in circumstances too! I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but no one can say that Jane Eyre does not have a satisfactory ending. Yes, there’s a tiny hint of darkness in the fairytale ending (no details on this), but there are generally smiles all round.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is quite a dark novel which spans two generations. Whilst the first generation suffer unspeakably, the younger characters overcome all this darkness to give the classic an intensely satisfactor…